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Key Focus Areas

In 2016-2017, we advanced important priority areas, including:

Reconciliation

In June 2015, The Truth and Reconciliation Commission released 94 calls to action in its final report. Since that time, the MHCC has committed to doing the hard work required to breathe life into some of those recommendations.

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Key Focus Areas

In 2016-2017, we advanced important priority areas, including:

Diversity

The Case for Diversity report was released on October 18, 2016. The report bridges the gap from interest to action by providing policy makers and system planners with empirical evidence about current mental health disparities and the cost savings associated with closing the divide.

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Key Focus Areas

In 2016-2017, we advanced important priority areas, including:

Unique Workplaces

The MHCC is committed to ensuring first responders and healthcare providers have the tools and resources they need to maintain the mental wellness of both themselves and those they work and interact with.

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Key Focus Areas

In 2016-2017, we advanced important priority areas, including:

Media & e-Mental Health

A key part of the MHCC’s work is building bridges to effect change that will reach people where they are. This includes supporting more responsible and meaningful media coverage, as well as our renewed focus on e-mental health.

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Key Focus Areas

In 2016-2017, we advanced important priority areas, including:

The National Standard of Canada for Psychological Health and Safety in the Workplace

The MHCC released the findings of our three-year Case Study Research Project, which tracked 40 Canadian organizations as they successfully implemented the National Standard of Canada for Psychological Health and Safety in the Workplace (Standard).

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Strengthening the case for investing in Canada's mental health system

1.6 million people in Canada report that their need for mental health care is unmet. As a society, we pay a high price for not meeting those needs. The cost of maintaining the status quo is well over $50 billion annually, and rising.

In March 2017, the MHCC published Strengthening the Case, which puts forward a compelling economic impetus for narrowing the spending gap between mental and physical health care.

For every dollar spent on providing psychotherapy to more people, $2 is saved.

Investing in the early years can save the system nearly 25 per cent in publicly funded services per person.

Collaborative care provided to people on short-term disability can result in 16 fewer days absent.

Providing six psychotherapy sessions in primary care for aging adults, as opposed to sedatives or no treatment, has as much as $13,000 in economic benefits.

Additional report highlights

Opening minds anti-stigma initiatives

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